Faculty, Wives, and Students

Group of women, students and faculty, outdoors on steps of building

 

Before the Women’s League was established, it was not uncommon for the wives of University professors to invite women students over for social hours. Faculty wives entertained students for tea and meals, which was a major social activity for women at the University because there was not a central body to organize social life for women yet. The trend of inviting women students over to faculty wivess homes continued once the League was established, as the first meeting of the League was held at Mrs. Adelia Cheever’s home.1 Globally, alumnae felt a strong connection to their alma mater, exemplified by the various donations from alumni chapters to the Women’s League building; the San Francisco Bay chapter bought an organ for the chapel, the Chinese society sent a pair of antique tapestries made from a royal Manchu dynasty robe, and the Japanese association donated luncheon cloths and napkins.2

Martha Cook 25th Anniversary Tea

 

1. Louise B. Stickney, "History of the Women's League," 1896, Box 1, Women’s League University of Michigan Records, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan.

2. "History of the Women's League," Folder: Michigan League - Histories - Miscellaneous, Box 31, Women’s League University of Michigan Records, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan.